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Graduated Doctoral Students


  • 24

    Dittitia Titiampruk

    Dr. Dittita Titiampruk (noodittita@correct.go.th) is our 24th Ph.D. graduate. Her dissertation titled: "Offender's Decision Making: An Assessment of Convicted Burglars in Thailand" was supervised by committee members Drs. Mark Stafford, Jay Jamieson, Lucia Summers, Nathee Chitsawang and Sunee Kanyajit. She currently works at the Department of Corrections, Ministry of Justice, Thailand. She is a Penologist at the Professional Level in the Foriegn Affair Division. She has also worked as a special lecturer at School of Criminal Justice, Mahidol University and School of Criminology, Chulalongkorn University.

  • 23

    Joe McKenna

    Dr. Joseph M. McKenna (jmm272@txstate.edu) is our 23rd Ph.D. graduate. He has a B.S. in Criminal Justice and Psychology from Roger Williams University (Bristol, RI) and a Master’s in Criminal Justice from Texas State University. Dr. McKenna conducts research in the areas of violence, school safety and emergency management, school crime/disorder, school climate, policing, public policy, and adolescent health. Currently, Joseph is interested in the roles, responses, and training of law enforcement officers assigned to K-12 school campuses and how research can be used to inform practice in these areas. His dissertation titled: "Examining the Use of Police in Schools: How Roles and Training May Impact the School-to-Prison Pipeline." was supervised by committee members Drs. Joycelyn Pollock, Mark Stafford, Scott Bowman, Michael Supancic, and Sean Varano. Dr. McKenna is now serving as the Associate Director of Research and Evaluation for the Texas School Safety Center at Texas State University. For more information visit here.

  • 22

    Lynn Greenwood

    Dr. Lynn Greenwood is our 22nd Ph.D. graduate. She had a career in juvenile justice before entering the world of academia, working in juvenile residential corrections, juvenile parole, and juvenile probation. She earned her Master’s degree in Criminal Justice at Tarleton State University and became a full-time lecturer at Texas A&M University Central Texas before pursuing her PhD at Texas State University. Her dissertation, titled “Juvenile Probation Officer Stress and Organizational Commitment” was supervised by committee members Drs. Joycelyn Pollock, Bob E. Vasquez, Mark Stafford, and Eric Lambert. Dr. Greenwood will be moving to a tenure-track position at Texas A&M University Central Texas in Killeen, Texas. For more information, visit https://www.tamuct.edu/departments/social-sciences/faculty.php

  • 21

    Lisa Bell (Holleran)

    Dr. Lisa Bell (Holleran) (lb19463@txstate.edu) is our 21st Ph.D. graduate. Her dissertation titled: "Future Dangerouness in Texas Death Penalty: A Content Analysis" was supervised by committee members Drs. Mark Stafford, Scott Bowman, Meredith Roundtree, and Ken Murray. Lisa is an adjunct professor at Texas State University

  • 20

    Michael Martaindale

    Dr. Hunter Martaindale is our 20th Ph.D. graduate. Dr. Martaindale earned a B.G.S. with a concentration in Criminal Justice from Texas A&M University – Texarkana. He then earned his M.S. in Criminal Justice in 2011 and his Ph.D. in Criminal Justice in August 2016 from Texas State University. Dr. Martaindale research focuses on improving law enforcement use of force tactics, tactical decision-making, and improving skill retention for law enforcement. Dr. Martaindale has co-authored a book on police tactics. Drs. J. Pete Blair, Beth A. Sanders, Scott Wm. Bowman, and Marcus Felson served as the committee members for his dissertation, titled: Examining the efficacy of computer-based visual training to improve the speed and accuracy of weapon acquisition in a dynamic use of force scenario. Dr. Martaindale is now serving as the Director of Research for the Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training (ALERRT) program at Texas State University. For more information visit here

  • 19

    Shannon Cunningham

    Dr. Cunningham obtained a B.A. and M.S. in Criminal Justice from Illinois State University before earning a Ph.D. in Criminal Justice from Texas State University in August 2016. She is our 19th Ph.D. graduate. Her dissertation, titled "Defense Attorneys' Perceptions of Prosecutorial Misconduct" was supervised by committee members Drs. Joycelyn Pollock, Mark Stafford, and Scott Bowman. Dr. Cunningham's research focuses on official misconduct and broader issues of social justice. She is currently employed as an Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice at Monmouth University. For more information visit here

  • 18

    Tiffany Cox

    Tiffany (Cox) Hernandez earned a B.A. in Russian Language from the University of Arizona and a Juris Doctorate from the University of Utah College of Law. Tiffany's research includes prosecutor misconduct, legislative responses to gun violence, and felon voting rights. Under the direction of Dr. Joycelyn Pollock, Tiffany's dissertation re-examined two Innocence Project studies concerning prosecutor misconduct using three qualitative methodologies: ethnographic content analysis, case studies, and interviews. Tiffany's work has been published in the American Journal of Criminal Justice, the Utah Law Review, and has been accepted for publication in the Criminal Law Bulletin.

  • 17

    Victoria Terranova

    Dr. Victoria Terranova (victoria.terranova@unco.edu) is our 17th Ph.D. graduate. Dr. Terranova earned her B.S. in Criminal Justice in 2007, M.S. in Criminal Justice in 2012, and Ph.D. in Criminal Justice in 2016 at Texas State University. While completing her Ph.D., Dr. Terranova was awarded the Outstanding Doctoral Student Award and Outstanding Graduate Student Award for the 2014-15 academic year. She was also awarded the 2015 Texas State University Doctoral Research Support Fellowship and 2015 Association of Doctoral Programs in Criminology and Criminal Justice Research Award. Dr. Terranova’s research focuses on recidivism, program evaluation, and corrections. Her dissertation titled: Evaluation of Alcohol Monitoring Technology’s Impact on Recidivism was chaired by Dr. Mark Stafford and committee members included Drs. Mitch Chamlin, Donna Vandiver, Pete Blair, and Robert Voas. She is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Northern Colorado. For more information visit here

  • 16

    Ward Adams

    Dr. Ward Adams is our 16th Ph.D. graduate.

  • 15

    Jaymi Elsass

    Dr. H. Jaymi Elsass (elsass@txstate.edu) is our 15th Ph.D. graduate. Dr. Elsass earned her B.S. in Sociology in 2008 from the University of Texas at Austin, and M.S. in Criminal Justice in 2010 as well as Ph.D. in Criminal Justice in 2015 from Texas State University. While completing her Ph.D., Dr. Elsass received the Student Paper Award from the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences for her coauthored work on the Boston bombing. During graduate school, she published research in a number of academic journals and edited volumes as well as a co-authored book entitled Mass shootings: Media, myths, and realities. The book received a Choice Award as an Outstanding Academic Title for 2016 from the American Library Association and received an "essential" designation, which is their highest ranking. Her dissertation, entitled "Juvenile delinquency outliers: An analysis of high-rate offenders and pure conformists," was chaired by Dr. Mark Stafford and committee members included Drs. Donna Vandiver, Daniel Mears, and Wayman Mullins. She is currently a lecturer in the School of Criminal Justice at Texas State University and serves as program coordinator for the Round Rock campus. For more information visit here.

  • 14

    Kristina Lopez

    Dr. Kristina Lopez is our 14th Ph.D. graduate. Her dissertation, titled "Generational Status and Hispanic Victimization: An Examination of Mediating Influences" was supervised by committee members Drs. Mark Stafford, Christine Sellers, Bob E. Vasquez and Holly V. Miller. Kristina is an assistant professor at University of North Florida. For more information: http://www.unf.edu/bio/N01045710/

  • 13

    Tammy Bracewell

    Dr. Tammy Bracewell is our 13th Ph.D. graduate. Drs. Brian Withrow, Joycelyn Pollock, Donna Vandiver, and Angela Ausbrooks served as committee members for her dissertation entitled: Children's Advocacy Centers' Effect on the Prosecutorial Decision to Accept or Reject Cases of Child Sexual Abuse. Tammy is an Assistant Professor at Texas A&M Central. For more information: https://www.tamuct.edu/departments/instructors/bracewelltammy.php

  • 12

    Stephen Glassner

    Dr. Stephen Glassner is our 12th Ph.D. graduate. Drs. Jocelyn Pollock, Mark Stafford, Bob Vasquez, and Leana Bouffard served as committee members for his dissertation, titled: "Evaluating Traumatic Life Events: An Assessment of the Health and Delinquent Outcomes of Youth Exposed to Trauma." Steven is an assistant professor at Columbus State University.

  • 11

    Paul Reynolds

    Dr. Paul D. Reynolds (paul.reynolds@untdallas) is our 11th Ph.D. graduate. DR. Reynolds earned a B.A. in Sociology from Stetson University and a M.S. with an emphasis in Public Service Management from Cumberland University. He then earned his Ph.D. in Criminal Justice in August 2015 from Texas State University. Dr. Reynolds’ research focuses on enhancing police organizational climates and improving police officer performance. Drs. Jocelyn Pollock, Beth Sanders, Bob Vasquez, and Mathew Hickman served as committee members for his dissertation, titled: The impact of fairness, organizational trust, and perceived organizational support on police officer performance. He is former police officer and U.S. Army veteran. Dr. Reynolds is currently an Assistant Professor, tenure-track, at University of North Texas at Dallas. For more information visit here

  • 10

    Anne Li Kringen

    Dr. Anne Li Kringen (akringen@newhave.edu) is our 10th Ph.D. graduate. Dr. Kringen earned her B.A. in International Affairs from Mary Washington University in Fredricksburg, VA in 2005. She earned her Masters in Criminal Justice in 2011 from Boston University and her Ph.D. in Criminal Justice in 2014 from Texas State University. Dr. Kringen’s research focuses on structural factors that limit representative bureaucracy in policing and other challenges to institutional change. Drs. Joy Pollock, Beth Saunders, Christine Sellers, Jeff Cancino, and Cynthia Lum served as committee members for her dissertation, Understanding Barriers that Affect Recruiting and Retaining Female Police Officers: A Mixed Method Approach, which won the Graduate College’s 2016 Outstanding Dissertation Award in Social Sciences. Dr. Kringen is now an assistant professor in the Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice and Forensic Science at the University of New Haven where she serves as Coordinator for the department’s Honors Program. Her recent work with the Police Foundation, Engaging Communities One Step at a Time, focuses on innovations in foot patrol. Her prior work has been published in Criminal Justice Policy Review, Policing, and Feminist Criminology. For more information visit here

  • 9

    Yongsok Kim

    Dr. Yongsok Kim is our ninth PhD. graduate. His dissertation, titled "Student Perceptions of School Resource Officers (SROs)." was supervised by committee members Drs. Brian Withrow, Dr. Jay Jamieson, Scott Bowman, and Timothy Austin. Dr. Yongsok is an assistant professor at Bemidji State University.

  • 8

    Kevin Jennings

    Dr. Kevin Jennings (kevin.Jennings@armstrong.edu) is our tallest and 8th Ph.D. graduate. Dr. Jennings earned a B.A., B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. from Texas State University. His research focuses on Cybercrime, Digital Forensics, and Law Enforcement use of Technology. Dr. Jennings is now an Assistant Professor at Armstrong State University in Savannah, Ga. where he was instrumental in the university receiving their designation from the National Security Agency as a Center of Academic Excellence. For more information visit here

  • 7

    Jaclyn Schildkraut

    Dr. Jaclyn Schildkraut (jaclyn.schildkraut@oswego.edu) is our 6th Ph.D. graduate. Dr. Schildkraut earned a B.S. in Interdisciplinary Studies with a concentration in Criminal Justice and Behavioral Sciences from the University of Central Florida (UCF) in 2009. She also earned her M.A. in Applied Sociology from UCF in 2011 and her Ph.D. from Texas State University in 2014. Drs. Mark Stafford (chair), Marcus Felson, and Scott Bowman all served as members of the committee for her dissertation entitled Mass Murder and the Mass Media: An Examination of the Media Discourse on U.S. Rampage Shootings, 2000-2012, which won the 2012 Richard Block Award for Outstanding Dissertation, presented by Homicide Research Working Group. Dr. Schildkraut’s research primarily focuses on mass shootings, particularly as these events intersect with the media, as well as safety and security practices and understanding potential causal factors. She has co-authored a book entitled Mass Shootings: Media, Myths, and Realities (2016), which focuses on understanding inaccurate information about these events and offering context. Dr. Schildkraut’s research has been published in Homicide Studies; American Journal of Criminal Justice; Crime, Law, and Social Change; Journal of Qualitative Criminal Justice & Criminology; Security Journal; and Criminology, Criminal Justice, Law & Society, as well as several edited volumes. Additionally, her research has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Politifact, VICE Media, and other national news outlets. She currently serves as a research analyst for Safe and Sound: A Sandy Hook Initiative, an organization aimed at smart, commonsense prevention in the wake of the shooting, with whom she has been working since 2014. Most recently, she was named to the program committee for the 2017 annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology (ASC), in charge of the entire crime and media section. During her time at Texas State, Dr. Schildkraut was named Outstanding Doctoral Student for two consecutive years (2012-2013 and 2013-2014) and also won the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (ACJS) student paper competition for her work with Jaymi Elsass examining the impact of the Boston Marathon bombing (2014). Her course on Crime Theories and Victimization (CJ 4340) won the Teaching with Sakai Innovation Award for Higher Education in 2012, following in the footsteps of Dr. Scott Bowman, who had won the award in a prior year. She credits her success to Drs. Mark Stafford, Donna Vandiver, and Scott Bowman, whom never waned in support nor words of encouragement during her journey at Texas State. Dr. Schildkraut currently serves as an Assistant Professor of Public Justice at the State University of New York at Oswego. For more information visit here

  • 6

    Jonathan Allen Kringen

    Dr. Jonathan Allen Kringen (jkringen@newhave.edu) is our 6th Ph.D. graduate. Dr. Kringen earned his B.A. in Spanish from the University of Texas at Austin in 2003. He then earned his M.S. in Criminal Justice in 2010 and his Ph.D. in Criminal Justice in 2014 from Texas State University. Dr. Kringen’s research focuses on improving law enforcement through the application of crime analysis and novel research methods. Drs. Kim Rossmo, J. Pete Blair, Marcus Felson, and Paul Brantingham served as committee members for his dissertation, Validating a Bayesian Model for Linking Serial Crimes through Simulation. Dr. Kringen is now an assistant professor in the Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice and Forensic Science at the University of New Haven where he serves as Director of Research for the department. His research has been published in Journal of Criminal Justice Education, Policing, and Journal of Criminal Justice. For more information visit here

  • 5

    Howard Williams

    Dr. Howard E. Williams (hw1007@txstate.edu) is our 5th Ph.D. graduate. Dr. Williams was a career police officer having served 25 years with the Austin (Texas) Police Department and 11 years as the Chief of Police in San Marcos, Texas. Dr. Williams earned his B.A.A.S.,M.S.C.J., and Ph.D. from Texas State University. During his doctoral studies, Dr. Williams was twice named the Outstanding Doctoral Student. He is also a graduate of the Leadership and Command College of the Law Enforcement Management Institute of Texas at Sam Houston State University. He is the author of four books in police sciences, and his research has been published in Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, Criminal Justice Policy Review, Criminal Justice Review, and the Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine. His dissertation, titled "Physiological Attributes of Arrest-Related Sudden Deaths Proximate to the Application of TASER Electronic Control Devices: An Evidence Based Study of the Theory," was supervised by committee members Drs. Jocelyn Pollock, Brian Withrow, J. Pete Blair, and Michael D. White. Dr. Williams is currently a lecturer in the School of Criminal Justice at Texas State University. For more information visit here

  • 4

    Steve Boehm

    Dr. Steve Boehm earned his Ph.D. in December 2013 and is our fourth Ph.D. graduate. His dissertation, titled "Exploring the Process of Desistance in Two High Risk Probation Populations" was supervised by committee members Drs. Jocelyn Pollock, Mark Stafford, Scott Bowman, and Nathan Pino. He currently teaches at Texas Lutheran University (www.tlu.edu) in Seguin where he serves as the interim chair of the Department of Political Science, Sociology, and Geography for the Spring 2017. His dissertation research on problem-solving courts was published in the Journal of Qualitative Criminal Justice & Criminology, and he authored a chapter in the Texas Lutheran University Freshman Reader. He was honored as the 2015-16 Professor of the Year by the campus Freshman Honor Society. He serves on the university Institutional Review Board and he is the outside evaluator for a National Science Foundation STEM grant. His former students are employed by the FBI, the Texas Department of Public Safety, Child Protective Services, and various municipal police departments, among other agencies. For more information visit here

  • 3

    Sara Scott

    Dr. Sarah Scott is our third Ph.D. graduate. Her dissertation, titled "An Examination of Frame of Reference and Self-Control in Alcohol and Drug Addicts" was supervised by committee members Mark Stafford, Joycelyn Pollock, Mitchell Chamlin, and StanFriedman. She is an Assistant Professor at Texas A&M Corpus Christi. For more information visit here

  • 2

    Erin Grant

    Dr. Erin Grant (erin.grant@washburn.edu) is our 2nd Ph.D. graduate. Dr. Grant earned her B.S. in Criminal Justice from Illinois State University in 2003; both her M.S. (2006) and PhD (2013) in Criminal Justice are from Texas State University. Her dissertation, titled "A Test of Self-Control in a Mexican-American Sample" was supervised by committee members Drs. Beth Sanders, Jeff Cancino, Bob E. Vasquez, and Alexander Vazsonyi. Dr. Grant is now an Assistant Professor at Washburn University in Topeka, Kansas, where she serves as internship coordinator and faculty mentor to the student Criminal Justice organization. Her research involves experiential learning as it relates to internships in criminal justice. Her work has been published in the Journal of Ethnographic and Qualitative Studies and Research in Higher Education Journal. For more information visit here

  • 1

    Michele Quiñones

    Dr. Michele Quiñones is our first Ph.D. graduate. Her dissertation, titled "Factors That Influence Perceptions of Racial Profiling During Police/Motorist Interactions" was supervised by committee members Drs. Brian Withrow, Jay Jamieson, and Scott Bowman. She is currently an Assistant Professor at Texas A&M University-Central Texas. For more information visit here